Maand: maart 2016

Decklijsten Monkly 27/03/2016

charly_monkly_modern_win
On this Easter Sunday 24 players showed up for the Monkly. The winner was getting an awesome playmat, spot in the Monkly invitational and a free entrance to the Dutch Modern Open + 1 Bye.

In round 5 it was clear that there would be a clean cut for the top-8. But in the end Charly emerged victorious with his UR Eldrazi beating Tobie’s Blue Moon in the finals.

Abzan Coco was clearly the most popular deck followed by Storm. Not as expected, there was only one lone-ranger who played Eldrazi.

Meta Breakdown
5 Abzan CoCo
3 Storm
2 Burn
2 Jund
1 UR Eldrazi
1 Blue Moon
1 Kiln Fiend
1 UWR Aggro
1 Allies
1 Small Zoo
1 Ascendancy Combo
1 GR Genesis Wave
1 8 Whack
1 Scapeshift
1 RG Tron
1 Esper Control

Charly Traarbach – UR Eldrazi

Creatures (31)
Endless One
Eldrazi Mimic
Vile Aggregate
Eldrazi Obligator
Eldrazi Skyspawner
Thought-Knot Seer
Reality Smasher
Drowner of Hope

Spells (5)
Dismember
Cyclonic Rift
Lands (24)
Wastes
Island
Steam Vents
Cavern of Souls
Eldrazi Temple
Eye of Ugin
Scalding Tarn
Shivan Reef

Sideboard (15)
Pyroclasm
Hurkyl's Recall
Gut Shot
Grafdigger's Cage
Stubborn Denial
Relic of Progenitus
Ulamog, the Ceaseless Hunger
Pithing Needle

Tobie Hupkens – Blue Moon

Creatures (7)
Pia and Kiran Nalaar
Snapcaster Mage

Spells (31)
Batterskull
Blood Moon
Serum Visions
Mana Leak
Remand
Spell Snare
Cryptic Command
Dismember
Electrolyze
Lightning Bolt
Burst Lightning
Lands (22)
Scalding Tarn
Misty Rainforest
Steam Vents
Sulfur Falls
Island
Mountain

Sideboard (15)
Roast
Vandalblast
Anger of the Gods
Spellskite
Izzet Staticaster
Batterskull
Negate
Vendilion Clique
Dispel

Isha Schoots – Blistering Swiftspear

Creatures (15)
Kiln Fiend
Monastery Swiftspear
Blistercoil Weird
Goblin Guide

Spells (27)
Apostle's Blessing
Assault Strobe
Temur Battle Rage
Gitaxian Probe
Manamorphose
Might of Old Krosa
Mutagenic Growth
Become Immense
Titan's Strength
Lands (18)
Wooded Foothills
Bloodstained Mire
Dryad Arbor
Stomping Ground
Windswept Heath
Mountain

Sideboard (15)
Lightning Bolt
Smash to Smithereens
Gut Shot
Abbot of Keral Keep
Apostle's Blessing
Shattering Spree

Sebastian Bott – UWR Aggro

Creatures (14)
Geist of Saint Traft
Lightning Angel
Snapcaster Mage
Mantis Rider

Planeswalkers (1)
Ajani Vengeant

Spells (20)
Lightning Bolt
Lightning Helix
Path to Exile
Remand
Spell Snare
Electrolyze
Serum Visions
Lands (25)
Scalding Tarn
Flooded Strand
Arid Mesa
Celestial Colonnade
Ghost Quarter
Plains
Island
Mountain
Sulfur Falls
Steam Vents
Hallowed Fountain
Sacred Foundry

Sideboard (15)
Rest in Peace
Engineered Explosive
Izzet Charm
Spellskite
Chained to the Rocks
Dispel
Negate
Wear // Tear
Elspeth, Sun's CHampion
Supreme Verdict
Stony Silence

Marcel van Dijk - Jund

Creatures (13)
Dark Confidant
Tarmogoyf
Kalitas, Traitor of Ghet
Tasigur, the Golden Fang
Scavenging Ooze

Planeswalkers (4)
Liliana of the Veil

Spells (19)
Abrupt Decay
Lightning Bolt
Inquisition of Kozilek
Thoughtseize
Terminate
Maelstrom Pulse
Kolaghan's Command
Lands (24)
Raging Ravine
Twilight Mire
Overgrown Tomb
Blood Crypt
Stomping Ground
Bloodstained Mire
Verdant Catacombs
Blackcleave Cliffs
Hissing Quagmire
Swamp
Forest
Treetop Village

Sideboard (15)
Ancient Grudge
Kitchen Finks
Fulminator Mage
Duress
Anger of the Gods
Kolaghan's Command
Abrupt Decay
Huntmaster of the Fells
Crumble to Dust
Thoughtseize

Christos Giannoulas – Allies

Creatures (28)
Hada Freeblade
Harabaz Druid
Kazandu Blademaster
Halimar Excavator
Oran-Rief Survivalist
Jwari Shapeshifter
Akoum Battlesinger
Kabira Evangel

Spells (10)
Aether Vial
Collected Company
Return to the Ranks
Lands (22)
Cavern of Souls
Ally Encampment
Arid Mesa
Wooded Foothills
Windswept heath
Stomping Ground
Temple Garden
Mountain
Plains
Forest
Sacred Foundry
Hallowed Fountain

Sideboard (15)
Gideon, Ally of Zendikar
Kataki, War's Wage
Ondu Cleric
Path to Exile
Return to the Ranks
Surgical extraction

Pascal Werkman – Small Zoo

Creatures (27)
Goblin Guide
Wild Nacatl
Kird Ape
Experiment One
Tarmogoyf
Burning-Tree Emissary
Reckless Bushwhacker

Spells (13)
Rancor
Lightning Bolt
Path to Exile
Atarka's Command
Forked Bolt
Devastating Summons
Sideboard (15)
Thalia, Guardian of Thraben
Deflecting Palm
Stony Silence
Destructive Revelry
Molten Rain
Path to Exile
Loxodon Smiter
Scavenging Ooze
Rest in Peace
Lightning Helix

Pascal van Alphen – Jeskai Ascendancy

Creatures (12)
Noble Hierarch
Birds of Paradise
Sylvan Caryatid
Fatestitcher

Spells (32)
Slaughter Pact
Gitaxian Probe
Noxious Revival
Serum Visions
Sleight of Hand
Cerulean Wisps
Silence
Anticipate
Manamorphose
Glittering Wish
Ideas Unbound
Jeskai Ascendancy
Lands (16)
Scalding Tarn
Misty Rainforest
Hallowed Fountain
Breeding Pool
Stomping Ground
Mana Confluence
Gemstone Mine
Island

Sideboard (15)
Gifts Ungiven
Unburial Rites
Iona, Shield of Emeria
Elesh Norn, Grand Cenobite
Silence
Zealous Persecution
Villainous Wealth
Abzan Charm
Scarscale Ritual
Guttural Response
Jeskai Ascendancy
Wear // Tear
Abrupt Decay

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Legacy 13/03 – Decklists

After a long break we finally had a Legacy tournament again in ’t Lab. 13 players showed to battle for the 1st place. They played 4 rounds and TOP-4. In the end no one stood a chance against Ward with his Colorless Eldrazi friends., congratulations!

Meta Breakdown
3 Grixis Delver
2 Colorless Eldrazi
2 Death & Taxes
2 Esper Stoneblade
1 Goblin Stompy
1 Reanimator
1 Goblin Stax
1 Elves
1 TES
1 Mono Black Control

Ward Poulisse - Colorless Eldrazi

Creatures (23)
Endbringer
Simian Spirit Guide
Phyrexian Revoker
Matter Reshaper
Reality Smasher
Thought-Knot Seer
Eldrazi Mimic
Endless One

Spells (12)
Warping Wail
Dismember
Chalice of the Void
Thorn of Amethyst
Lands (25)
Cavern of Souls
Urborg, Tomb of Yawgmoth
City of Traitors
Ancient Tomb
Wasteland
Eldrazi Temple
Eye of Ugin

Sideboard (15)
Umezawa's Jitte
Cursed Totem
Ratchet Bomb
Karakas
Warping Wail
Relic of Progenitus
Endbringer

Wouter Seas - Death & Taxes

Creatures (26)
Mother of Runes
Stoneforge Mystic
Thalia, Guardian of Thraben
Vryn Wingmare
Flickerwisp
Serra Avenger
Phyrexian Revoker

Spells (11)
Aether Vial
Swords to Plowshares
Batterskull
Sword of Fire and Ice
Umezawa's Jitte
Lands (23)
11 Plains
Wasteland
Rishadan Port
Karakas
Mishra's Factory

Sideboard (15)
Mindbreak Trap
Rest in Peace
Mirran Crusader
Council's Judgment
Containment Priest
Pithing Needle
Sunlance
Ethersworn Canonist
Ratchet Bomb

Jelmer Zeilstra - Rakdos Country Club

Creatures (22)
Magus of the Moon
Simian Spirit Guide
Moggcatcher
Goblin Rabblemaster
Goblin Dark-Dwellers
Goblin Settler
Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker
Siege-Gang Commander
Tuktuk Scrapper

Spells (20)
Chrome Mox
Chalice of the Void
Blood Moon
Magma Jet
Stone Rain
Boom // Bust
Lands (18)
10 Mountain
City of Traitors
Ancient Tomb

Sideboard (15)
Ensnaring Bridge
Trinisphere
Anarchy
Sudden Demise
Koth of the Hammer
Boil
Goblin Sharpshooter
Stingscourger
Tuktuk Scrapper

Robbert van der Pas - Reanimator

Creatures (7)
Elesh Norn, Grand Cenobite
Grave Titan
Griselbrand
Iona, Shield of Emeria
Tidespout Tyrant

Spells (39)
Animate Dead
Brainstorm
Careful Study
Daze
Duress
Entomb
Exhume
Force of Will
Lotus Petal
Misdirection
Pithing Needle
Ponder
Reanimate
Lands (12)
Bloodstained Mire
Island
Polluted Delta
Watery Grave
Underground Sea

Sideboard (15)
Blazing Archon
Dread of Night
Echoing Truth
Inkwell Leviathan
Pithing Needle
Sickening Dreams
Thoughtseize
Tormod's Crypt
Sire of Insanity

Shadows over Innistrad – Mechanics

Greetings, Planeswalker. Congratulations on such a successful visit to Zendikar. The tales of your travels are surely spreading throughout the Multiverse. Such heroism! It must be gratifying to have saved an entire world. I imagine you’re heading to some pastoral plane for some much-needed recuperation. Wait, you’re going where? Innistrad? Bleak world of horror and death? That Innistrad? Um…we should probably have a look at the mechanics from Shadows over Innistrad then, so you’ll be ready. Okay, you realize those shadows aren’t like rainbow shadows, right?

Double-Faced Cards

It wouldn’t be Innistrad if horrible things weren’t transforming into other horrible things, so double-faced cards make their return. Each double-faced card has two card faces and no back. Whoa! For the most part, they haven’t changed, although we have made a few rules tweaks that may pop up. If you’re comfortable with double-faced cards, feel free to skip down to the Double-Faced Cards Rules Changes section. If you’re still stuck on “Whoa,” let’s go over what you need to know.

(Hey, quick aside. Look, I don’t know if my editor is going to let this fly, but I’m already sick of typing “double-faced card.” I’m just going to run with DFC. Everyone knows what I mean, right? Sweet.)

Each face has its own set of characteristics: name, types, abilities, and so on. While a DFC is on the battlefield, only the face that’s up matters. If a DFC isn’t on the battlefield, the front face is all that matters. You cast all DFCs using the front face. This means you cast Elusive Tormentor, paying {2}{B}{B}. You can’t cast Insidious Mist or any other back face. When the spell resolves, Elusive Tormentor enters the battlefield.

The front faces of DFCs (and some back faces) each have an ability that transforms that permanent. When a DFC transforms, it turns over to its other face. A DFC that transforms never leaves the battlefield, so any counters on it stay on, any Auras or Equipment attached to it stay attached, and anything that was affecting it continues to. If it was attacking or blocking, it stays attacking or blocking. Transforming doesn’t give a permanent “summoning sickness,” so if a creature has been under your control continuously since the beginning of your turn, it can still attack even if it transforms—assuming it transforms into a creature! Some DFCs, like Elusive Tormentor/Insidious Mist, can transform back and forth throughout the game. For other DFCs, it’s usually a one-way trip.

Checklist Cards

It’s pretty important that all the cards in your deck are indistinguishable from one another from the back. Nowadays, most people use opaque card sleeves to accomplish this. If you’re playing with DFCs and opaque card sleeves, you’re good. But some people don’t use sleeves, especially in Limited events. What then?

Note that most of the names aren’t actually blacked out on the card, we just can’t tell you what they are yet. Or don’t want to. It’s all the same to you.

You’ll find checklist cards in some Shadows over Innistrad booster packs. There are two of them: one for commons and uncommons and another for rares and mythic rares. They act as substitutes for DFCs in your hand or library (or if they somehow get exiled face down). Before the game, just mark which DFC you’re playing with and use the checklist card in the deck. You must have the real DFC with you in order to use a checklist card. Just don’t mix it up with your sideboard, if you have one. On the battlefield or in the graveyard, use the actual DFC. If it gets bounced to your hand or shuffled into your library, swap the checklist card back in. You must use checklist cards, opaque sleeves, or both.

Double-Faced Cards Rules Changes

We tweaked three things about DFCs this time around to smooth out some edge cases. Oh, did you skip to this section from the top? Yeah, we say “DFCs” now. We cool like that. This part gets a bit technical, but we’ll be back in “Happy Mechanic Preview Land” soon, I swear.

1. Converted mana cost

Remember when I said that the characteristics of the face that’s up are all that matter? That wasn’t quite accurate. Under the new rules, the converted mana cost of the back face of a DFC is based on the mana cost of the front face. (Previously, because the back faces lacked mana costs, their converted mana costs were all 0.) The one exception is if something is a copy of the back face of a DFC, its converted mana cost is 0. So If I control Insidious Mist, it has no mana cost, but its converted mana cost is 4. If I then put a copy of Insidious Mist onto the battlefield, that copy’s converted mana cost is 0.

2. Entering the battlefield transformed

A few effects can put a card onto the battlefield transformed. This means to put it on the battlefield with its back face up. Starting with this set, we have a new rule that if you’re told to put a card that isn’t a DFC onto the battlefield transformed, it just stays where it is. This may affect a few cards in this set, but I think the Magic Origins planeswalkers illustrate the change nicely. (This is code for “The cool cards in this set I could use to illustrate this haven’t been previewed yet.” I know. I feel the same way.) Say you control a Clone that’s copying Jace, Vryn’s Prodigy, and you activate faux-Jace’s ability with four thousand cards in your graveyard. Well, four thousand is “five or more,” so faux-Jace dutifully exiles himself. Then he tries to return transformed, but in exile he’s just a single-faced Clone. He’s not a DFC, so he gets detained at the border and remains in exile. I hope the card you drew was good, because this wasn’t a great play otherwise.

3. No flippy-floppy

I’ve saved our most technical change for last. Here’s the new rule: if a DFC has an activated or triggered ability that transforms it, that permanent transforms only if it hasn’t since that ability was put on the stack. What does that mean? For example, say you activate Elusive Tormentor’s ability, then you activate it again in response. Why? Because you want to discard a lot of cards. Why? We’re almost there. Relax. The first ability to resolve will cause Elusive Tormentor to transform, as expected. But the second ability won’t, as Elusive Tormentor has already transformed because of the first ability.

Delirium

As advertised, Innistrad is a bleak world of horror and death, so a focus on the graveyard is to be expected. Delirium is a new ability word that highlights cards that get better if you have four or more card types represented in your graveyard. There are many different kinds of delirium abilities, including activated abilities such as the one found on Reaper of Flight Moonsilver.

The card types that could show up in your graveyard are artifact, creature, enchantment, instant, land, planeswalker, sorcery, and tribal (a card type found on older cards). Don’t count supertypes like basic or legendary, and don’t count subtypes like Vampire or Equipment. The number of cards doesn’t matter, as long as you get four or more card types. An artifact creature, an instant, and a planeswalker will do the trick.

As to how you get all these card types in your graveyard, there’s the traditional route: have some creatures die in combat, cast a few spells, maybe a planeswalker will decide she’s had enough of your shenanigans and sit in your graveyard for a while because her loyalty…look, not every metaphor works, okay? We’ve also helpfully supplied some other ways to get cards into your graveyard, such as Warped Landscape.

Some instants and sorceries have additional effects if you have four or more card types in your graveyard. Others use “instead” to denote an upgraded effect. Remember that the resolving instant or sorcery doesn’t count. It’s on the stack as you follow its instructions, not in your graveyard.

Investigate and Clues

Mysteries permeate Innistrad like strange references permeate my writing. Zoinks! To solve these mysteries, you’ll need to investigate and follow the Clues.

She looks friendly enough. I’m sure she’ll help! Investigate is a new keyword action found in Shadows over Innistrad. It’s pretty straightforward. To investigate, you put a Clue token onto the battlefield. A Clue is a new artifact type. Clues are colorless artifacts (what, you though they’d be blue?), and they each have the ability “{2}, Sacrifice this artifact: Draw a card.”

The Inspector does a bit of investigating, but she goes on her first coffee break pretty early. Perhaps a classic tool of examination will prove a more reliable source of information.

Most of the time, you’ll sacrifice Clues to draw cards—but they are artifacts, so I’m sure you’ll find other uses for them as well.

Madness

The next stop on our tour of brand new, never-before-seen Shadows over Innistrad abilities is madness, a returning ability you may have seen before. If you discard a card with madness, you exile it instead of putting it into your graveyard. This causes an ability to trigger. When that ability resolves, you can cast the spell for its madness cost. If you don’t cast the spell this way, it’s put into your graveyard. Well, all of that just sounds insane.

Note that the mandatory discard into exile is a small change from previous rules. Before, you could discard a card with madness into your graveyard and skip the whole madness thing. This may be relevant with cards like Jace, Vryn’s Prodigy. That dude shows up a lot in this article for a card not in this set.

One cool thing about casting a spell using the madness ability is it doesn’t matter what its card types are. So if you manage to discard a creature card with madness during an opponent’s turn, you can cast that spell and maybe create a surprise blocker. The spell’s mana cost and converted mana cost don’t change. You’re just paying the madness cost instead.

It doesn’t matter why you’re discarding a card with madness. It could be to pay the activation cost for an ability like Elusive Tormentor’s. Maybe it’s because your opponent has forced you to with their own spell. Heck, maybe the turn’s ending and you’ve got more than seven cards in hand, you rascal. Whatever the reason, you’ll have the chance to cast the card by paying its madness cost. Just remember that you can’t just discard a card because you want to. Something has to be telling you to. And not just the wind.

Oh, yeah. That’s fine. It can tell you to. No problem here. Moving on…

Skulk

By now, I’m sure you’ve noticed that Innistrad is a bleak world of…Right, we’ve been over this. For some creatures, being all conspicuous isn’t the best plan. For those creatures, we present a new keyword: skulk. A creature with skulk can’t be blocked by any creature with greater power. Introducing Farbog Revenant.

Aww…it’s totes adorbs, in an inky kind of way. With skulk, you consider the power of potential blockers only as blocks are being declared. If Farbog Revenant gets legally blocked by a 1-power creature, raising the power of the blocker won’t undo the block. But if your opponent has amassed beefy defenses, skulk can be an effective way to sneak damage in.

Happy Hunting!

And that’s it. I hope this look at Shadows over Innistrad will prepare you for your Prerelease and beyond. In addition to the new and returning mechanics, there are many great individual cards to keep a Planeswalker such as yourself on your toes. Or fins. Protuberances? Whatever you got. I don’t judge.

Original source »

Shadows over Innistrad – Packaging

 

In a set full of mysteries, I have no doubt many players and Innistrad experts will be poring over these images looking for clues to the set’s contents, to Innistrad’s future, and to the mysteries the set portends.

Also, they’re pretty.

Let’s start with the first packaging you’re likely to hold: the Prerelease kit (Prereleases are April 2—contact your local game store now for registration, these can fill up fast!).

There are two parts to the kit, one of which is the exterior sleeve, featuring a face you should get pretty familiar with for this article: Jace, shadowy figure.

But when you pull the sleeve off, you’ll be greeted by this cool packaging to hold your cards.

And if you do well at the Prerelease, you could win some packs! And those packs look a little like these. First up, a Vampire of some ill repute, no doubt.

Next, what I’m sure is a run-of-the-mill Werewolf. Probably nothing special about it that would place it on the packaging.

Next up is the mad Avacyn, the Purifier, the flipped side of Archangel Avacyn.

And it wouldn’t be an Innistrad set if we didn’t get a glimpse of Sorin. But what kind of glimpse will we receive? And when?

This is Jace. You’ve met.

Shadows over Innistrad will also come in Fat Pack form, and it’ll look a little something like this:

Which looks quite a bit like the Deck Builder’s Toolkit:

And, in case you haven’t seen enough spooky Jace with a popped collar, well…

All of these will be available April 8 when Shadows over Innistrad goes on sale.

Original source »

Conspiracy #2: Take the Crown

You Stab My Back and I’ll Stab Yours

Clearly the crown is up for grabs. Will you claim it?

No more jokes. No more intrigue. For real this time.

The throne no longer sits empty, but deception, danger, and even death await around every corner.

Add deeper layers of intrigue to your next Magic draft and begin plotting as soon as you open your first booster pack! The Conspiracy: Take the Crown set builds on the revolutionary abilities introduced in the original Magic: The Gathering—Conspiracy set, with new cards that affect the draft itself and new conspiracies that twist the rules against your foes. Trade votes and spread your attacks to manipulate the game in your favor. Seize the crown to give yourself a greater edge—if you can keep it.

How will you plot your way to the throne?

This set is designed for eight-player drafts followed by free-for-all games of three to five players each.

Set Name

Conspiracy: Take the Crown

Number of Cards

220 221

Release Date

August 26, 2016

Official Three-Letter Code

CN2

Twitter Hashtag

#MTGCN2

Initial Concept and Game Design

Shawn Main (lead)
Nik Davidson
Bryan Hawley
Ken Nagle
Matt Tabak

Final Game Design and Development

Ben Hayes (lead)
Bryan Hawley
Jonathan Skolnik
James Sooy
Gavin Verhey

Languages Available

English, Japanese, Chinese Simplified

MSRP

$3.99

Original source »